Lewis’s Literary Criticism:

Medieval Cosmology

Overview

C.S. Lewis attached significant importance to medieval cosmology, which viewed what we today call space as the heavens or the cosmos. This view contradicted the modern notion of space as simply a barren vacuum. Lewis reveled in this pre-Copernican understanding, not only because he thought it beautiful and good but ultimately because of its permanent spiritual significance.

Lecture

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Q & A Session

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Michael Ward is a distinguished visiting professor at Hillsdale College, a fellow of Blackfriars Hall, University of Oxford, and professor of apologetics at Houston Baptist University. He studied English at Oxford, theology at the University of Cambridge, and he has a Ph.D. in divinity from the University of St. Andrews. He served as chaplain of St. Peter’s College, Oxford, from 2009 to 2012, and of Peterhouse, Cambridge, from 2004 to 2007. He is the author of Planet Narnia: The Seven Heavens in the Imagination of C.S. Lewis (Oxford University Press), co-editor of The Cambridge Companion to C.S. Lewis (Cambridge University Press), and presenter of the BBC television documentary, The Narnia Code. On the 50th anniversary of Lewis’s death, November 22, 2013, Dr. Ward unveiled a permanent national memorial to him in Poets’ Corner, Westminster Abbey, London.