Lewis’s Apologetics:

Imagination and Reason, Part One

Overview

C.S. Lewis was the greatest Christian apologist of the 20th century. The success of his apologetics was due in large part to the skillful way in which he presented them—with imaginative skill and imaginative intent. Lewis believed that the human faculty of reason is the organ of truth and the human faculty of imagination is the organ of meaning. Because imagination is the indispensable companion of reason, Lewis encouraged the embrace of meaningful myths in his apologetics.

Lecture

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Q & A Session

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Michael Ward is a distinguished visiting professor at Hillsdale College, a fellow of Blackfriars Hall, University of Oxford, and professor of apologetics at Houston Baptist University. He studied English at Oxford, theology at the University of Cambridge, and he has a Ph.D. in divinity from the University of St. Andrews. He served as chaplain of St. Peter’s College, Oxford, from 2009 to 2012, and of Peterhouse, Cambridge, from 2004 to 2007. He is the author of Planet Narnia: The Seven Heavens in the Imagination of C.S. Lewis (Oxford University Press), co-editor of The Cambridge Companion to C.S. Lewis (Cambridge University Press), and presenter of the BBC television documentary, The Narnia Code. On the 50th anniversary of Lewis’s death, November 22, 2013, Dr. Ward unveiled a permanent national memorial to him in Poets’ Corner, Westminster Abbey, London.